My Healthy Stream

FREE handbook! Do you own streamside property within the Farmington River Watershed? Eager to learn more? Contact us to receive a FREE copy of My Healthy Stream – A Handbook for Streamside Owners!

A publication of Trout Unlimited and the Aldo Leopard Foundation.

Funding for FRWA’s River Smart outreach program is provided in part from the Long Island Sound Futures Fund, administered by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

 

To receive your copy, contact:
Laura Hart
Project Manager of River Smart
860-658-4442 ex 203 lhart@frwa.org

Farmington River Archeology Canoe Trip – Saturday July 22, 2017

Paddle along our own ancient Native American canoe trail as we explore the fascinating culture of the people who inhabited the Farmington River Valley thousands of years ago. Learn about the latest archeological discoveries from Ken Feder, Professor of Anthropology, Central Connecticut State University, and founder of the Farmington River Archeology Project.  Trip starts at 9:00 am.

Pre-registration is required for canoe trips.
Canoe trips take from 2-4 hours and paddlers must be able to handle a canoe in flat water.
Cost per person:
Members: Need a boat: $20; Have a boat: $15
Non-members: Need a boat: $25; Have a boat: $20

Space is limited and trips sell out quickly!  To register, please contact FRWA at
(860) 658-4442, or email: river@frwa.org.

RESCHEDULED: Twilight on the River Canoe Trip – Friday July 14, 2017

This trip will now be held on July 14th!

Paddle our beautiful Farmington River in the cool of evening, in the company of great blue herons, muskrats, beavers, and other crepuscular wildlife. Enjoy a little night music orchestrated by native songbirds and singing insects.  Jay Kaplan, Naturalist and Director of Roaring Brook Nature Center will illuminate the mysteries of our river communities as daylight fades to nightfall. Trip may land after nightfall.

Summer is here and so are FRWA’s canoe trips– easy flatwater paddles for enjoying the river’s scenery, wildlife, and history.  Will you join us?  Details below!

Pre-registration is required for canoe trips.
Canoe trips take from 2-4 hours and paddlers must be able to handle a canoe in flat water.
Cost per person:
Members: Need a boat: $20; Have a boat: $15
Non-members: Need a boat: $25; Have a boat: $20

Space is limited and trips sell out quickly!  To register, please contact FRWA at (860) 658-4442, or email: river@frwa.org.

BEER TASTING May 18th to benefit the FRWA

Join the FRWA at Thomas Hooker Brewery to celebrate and protect the pristine water of our watershed while enjoying a beer tasting fundraiser!

Tickets include: incredible live music, unlimited beer tastings and a tour of the state-of the-art brewery. You can also join in the excitement of our “beer cup” auction with a wide variety of GREAT prizes and partake of the delicious and unique gourmet pretzels from The Comfort Zone Food Truck which will be parked on site (a portion of all pretzels sold will be donated back to FRWA – that’s a nice twist!).

We will also have snacks and soft drinks on hand! Tell your friends and family to come as well as we toast and support the amazing work of FRWA!

FREE EVENT: Natural Lawn Care, Thursday, April 27 6:00 pm

The FRWA and the New Hartford Land Trust want you to get your lawn in shape without using chemical fertilizers or pesticides. Skeptical? Attend the upcoming workshop!

Aimee Petras, Education & Outreach Coordinator for the FRWA will talk tips for mowing, seeding, watering and ways to manage common weeds and pests that can complicate natural lawn care. She will cover six rules of a green lawn and will also address weeds, grubs and other lawn problems. Bring your questions! Learn new ways to maintain your lawn. For more information, e-mail newhartfordlandtrust@yahoo.com or call 860-480-4844.

EVENT: Natural Lawn Care Presentation – April 29, 2017, 9:00 – 10:30 am

Aimee Petras, Education & Outreach Coordinator for the Farmington River Watershed Association wants you to get your lawn in shape without using chemical fertilizers or pesticides.

Skeptical?  Attend her upcoming workshop on April 29 from 9-10:30 am at Winding Trails in Farmington.  She will outline tips for mowing, seeding, watering and ways to manage common weeds and pests that can complicate natural lawn care. You will leave knowing steps you need to take including getting a soil test through mowing techniques. Additionally, we’ll delve into common lawn problems such as grubs and thatch. Registration is required by three days prior. Register here: https://www.windingtrails.org/register/?id=717. 

EVENT: The Future of Our Forests: Stewarding Our Lands Thoughtfully

6:00 p.m. | Simsbury Public Library Program Room
RSVP’s are required by April 10

The Town of Simsbury, the Simsbury Land Trust, the Canton Land Conservation Trust and the Farmington River Watershed Association cordially invite you to attend:

The Future of Our Forests: Stewarding Our Lands Thoughtfully

This Regional Forum will feature Dr. Edward Faison, Senior Ecologist from Highstead, a regional organization in Redding, CT dedicated to forest research and long term monitoring. Dr. Faison will present information on how municipalities and land trusts can establish a landscape and historical approach to stewarding our protected preserves and better understand How, When and Why we should monitor and manage our forests.

We will provide a light supper at 6:00 pm with the program starting at 7:00 pm on April 17 in the Program Room at the Simsbury Public Library, 725 Hopmeadow Street, Simsbury CT.

Questions and RSVP’s (by April 10th) to Helen Peterson, hkpeterson@comcast.net.

S. 617 Passes Committee!

FRWA note: Follow the Bill Progress here:  S.617 Progress

Just two weeks after reintroducing the bill in the Senate, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) and U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) applauded the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on Thursday for passing the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic River Act – legislation Murphy has sponsored since serving in the House of Representatives that would create a U.S. National Park Service protective designation for the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook. The bill, which was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by U.S. Representative Elizabeth Esty (CT-5) and cosponsored by U.S. Representative John Larson (CT-1), now awaits passage in the Senate.

“Connecticut residents have spent more than a decade working hard to protect the Farmington River and Salmon Brook, and today’s passage is proof that my colleagues in Washington are paying attention,” said Murphy. “We’re now another step closer to getting this bill signed into law. I won’t stop fighting until we do.”

“Today’s passage is great news for all of us who have been tirelessly fighting to protect and preserve this truly wild and scenic treasure. I look forward to working with my colleagues to get this bill across the finish line.”

With protective designation as a “wild and scenic river,” the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook – which runs through ten Connecticut towns – could receive as much as $100,000 in federal funding to assist volunteers and officials with conservation efforts. The upper portion of the river was given protected status in 1994.

Murphy, Esty, Blumenthal, and Larson have continuously pushed for the Lower Farmington River’s Wild & Scenic designation. Last year, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic River Act for the first time ever. Former U.S. Representative Nancy Johnson, who was Murphy’s predecessor in the U.S. House of Representatives, helped enact legislation that initiated the study on which the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic River Act is based. The study was completed in 2011 and confirmed the suitability of designating the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook as Wild & Scenic.

World Water Day – Mar. 22, 2017

HARTFORD, CONN. – Eight organizations from across Connecticut are coming together to celebrate water on United Nations World Water Day, March 22.WWD2017

Clean Water Action, Connecticut Fund for the Environment and its bi-state program Save the Sound, Connecticut River Watershed Council, Eightmile Wild & Scenic Watershed, Farmington River Watershed Association, Rivers Alliance of Connecticut, The Nature Conservancy, and Salmon River Watershed Partnership have developed a brief document highlighting successes and challenges of Connecticut’s water stewardship. The document will be distributed to state legislators, agencies, residents, and other stakeholders in Connecticut’s water future on World Water Day.

“Connecticut has had tremendous victories in protecting drinking water and restoring rivers, but at the same time, there are ongoing threats to the quality and quantity of our water,” said Karen Burnaska, water projects coordinator for CFE/Save the Sound. “Today our organizations are showing solidarity with communities affected by water pollution, drought, or industrial over-use of water resources.”

The alliance of statewide organizations and watershed associations is calling on the lawmakers to safeguard Connecticut’s water resources when setting policy.  Anne Hulick, Connecticut director for Clean Water Action, said, “It was not long ago that rivers were dumping grounds for debris and toxic chemicals and the Cuyahoga River caught fire. World Water Day is a day to celebrate how far we’ve come and to make sure we continue to protect this most precious resource.”

“Water sustains life in all forms on Earth. In Connecticut, The Nature Conservancy works with private citizens, businesses, other nonprofits and public agencies to protect water quality, stream flows, aquatic and wetland habitats and our coastlines—for people and nature,” said Sally Harold, director of river restoration and fish passage for The Nature Conservancy in Connecticut.

Pat Young, of the Eightmile Wild & Scenic Watershed and Salmon River Watershed Partnership, said, “World Water Day is a reminder that the work we do at a watershed level everyday helps protect water resources for future generations. Healthy watersheds are healthy communities!”

“Every day of the year, we benefit from Connecticut’s water resources,” added Eileen Fielding, executive director of the Farmington River Watershed Association. “World Water Day is a moment to appreciate what we have, and ask what we can do to conserve and protect water in our state and worldwide.”
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Murphy, Esty, Blumenthal, Larson reintroduce Wild & Scenic Bill to protect Lower Farmington River

WASHINGTON – Building on a nearly decade-long, community-driven effort, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) and U.S. Representative Elizabeth Esty (CT-5), joined by U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and U.S. Representative John Larson (CT-1), reintroduced their Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic River Act to create a U.S. National Park Service protective designation for the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook. With protective designation as a “Wild and Scenic River,” the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook – which runs through ten Connecticut towns – would be eligible to receive as much as $100,000 in federal funding to support conservation efforts. (Follow the Bill Progress here:  S.617 Progress)

“The Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic Act is the product of years of hard work by passionate Connecticut residents who want to protect the natural beauty of our state. Congress should listen to them,” said Murphy. “I started working on this issue as soon as I got to Congress nearly 10 years ago, and we haven’t stopped fighting for it. I hope we’ll get this over the finish line soon.”

“The Farmington River is an economic and environmental treasure for our state,” Esty said. “Families from across Connecticut and around the world travel to the Farmington River to enjoy the fishing, boating, and other recreational opportunities it offers. This bill is good for our communities, our economy, and our environment. By passing this bill, we can ensure that we preserve this environmental treasure for generations to come.” 

“This measure will help protect and preserve the Farmington River—a truly wild and scenic treasure that brings both economic and recreational benefits. I am hopeful that my colleagues will come together to ensure this precious natural resource receives this designation and much-needed federal resources, so the Farmington River can be enjoyed by many generations to come,” said Blumenthal 

“The Farmington River and Salmon Brook are some of Connecticut’s most treasured resources that provide natural beauty, support ecological diversity, and recreational opportunities for residents and visitors.  I am pleased to join my colleagues in reintroducing this legislation to designate these rivers as ‘wild and scenic’.  This designation is crucial in protecting this body of water for generations to come,” said Larson.

The Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook runs through the following Connecticut towns: Avon, Bloomfield, Burlington, Canton, East Granby, Farmington, Granby, Hartland, Simsbury, and Windsor. The upper portion of the river was given protected status in 1994.

Murphy, Esty, Blumenthal, and Larson have introduced similar legislation previously, and have continuously pushed for the Lower Farmington River’s Wild & Scenic designation. Last year, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic River Act for the first time ever. Former U.S. Representative Nancy Johnson, who was Murphy’s predecessor in the U.S. House of Representatives, helped enact legislation that initiated the study on which the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic River Act is based. The study was completed in 2011 and confirmed the suitability of designating the Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook as Wild & Scenic.

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